flamie101

flamie101:

bbrightstar:

Why the fuck would I want to be equal to males? When did feminism go from dismantling patriarchy to “Equality”. I want the liberation of all females FROM males and patriarchy, not to hold hands with them! It’s been apparent to me for a while that most people can’t really imagine “equality.” All…

First of all, please staple your hands together so you may never type again. Feminism was ALWAYS about equality, its just people like YOU who are whining about a nonexistant everyday oppression that DOES NOT HAPPEN. Its people like YOU who make feminism seem like a joke. Its people like YOU that need to step back and reexamine your entire life. If you don’t want to have stereotypes brought against you, then DO NOT PUT STEREOTYPES ON MEN.

No.

Feminism is about liberation, not equality

Why the fuck would I want to be equal to males? When did feminism go from dismantling patriarchy to “Equality”. I want the liberation of all females FROM males and patriarchy, not to hold hands with them! It’s been apparent to me for a while that most people can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they imagine is having the existing power structure inverted. They think if I say I don’t want equality, that means I want females to have power over males(ya know like we’ve had for centuries).

I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them.

Get it straight, 

“A commitment to sexual equality with men is a commitment to becoming the rich instead of the poor, the rapist instead of the raped, the murderer instead of the murdered.” - Andrea Dworkin

"Most people in the United States think of feminism or the most commonly used term “women’s lib” as a movement that aims to make women the social equals of men. This broad definition, popularized by the media and mainstream segments of the movement, raises problematic questions. Since men are not equals in white supremacist, capitalist, patriarchal class structure, which men do women want to be equal to? Do women share a common vision of what equality means? Implicit in this simplistic definition of women’s liberation is a dismissal of race and class as factors that, in conjunction with sexism, determine the extent to which an individual will be discriminated against, exploited, or oppressed.”—Bell Hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center

“People sometimes say that we will know feminism has done its job when half the CEOs are women. That’s not feminism; to quote Catharine MacKinnon, it’s liberalism applied to women. Feminism will have won not when a few women get an equal piece of the oppression pie, served up in our sisters’ sweat, but when all dominating hierarchies - including economic ones - are dismantled.”― Lierre Keith

evilfeminist

evilfeminist:

flyfastlivefree:

goodmoleman2u:

predatory male “feminists” who infiltrate groups of women with the obvious clear intent of sleeping with them

There’s a difference between joining that group with the intention of raping a woman and the intention of pursuing one of them for consensual sex, though.

You’re drawing a really basic line there, I think everyone will agree rape is bad? If a dude is going a feminist group with the intention of getting sex from it, he doesn’t need to be in that space, regardless of consent. 

fishermans-flowers asked:

I read your blog every day and I think it's so wonderful and perfect, you are so incredibly gorgeous and I love your writings, would you ever consider write a book someday?? :) xoxo

I’m not really much of a writer. I feel like everything I can say others have said better at some point, so I try to give credit where credit is due and just tell people to go read some radical feminist books. So many intelligent women who have come before me have so little recognition…

coffeeandcockatiels replied to your post: anonymous said:Just because he wa…

What about the trending desire of South Koreans to want to get surgery to look western? I’m genuinely curious. It wasn’t face paint or a mask, it was plastic surgery.

This is true. There are many asian people, as well as many black or hispanic people(basically anyone not white-passing) who will go to great lengths to look more western(white). The reason that this isn’t the same at all, and why it’s not racist or appropriation, is because white people are not oppressed. If whites were the marginalized systematically oppressed group and someone did that, then yes that is appropriation/racism.

The reason why physical differences between races or sex MATTER is because power needs them to. There is no “African brain” or “Chinese brain” just like there is no such thing as a “lady” or “dude” brain. Different races are not innately or fundamentally superior or inferior, just like men and women, while biologically different - are not mentally very different at all. Power needs the construct of “race” and the construct of “gender” to make certain groups of people feel different or lesser(in white people’s case, superior) in order to make power seem like the natural order of things. Thus, I think people who get surgery to look more white, are doing so because they know that white features are considered more favorable, beautiful, and valuable in the dominant culture - Which is a white supremacy. 

thisisnotjapan

HEY HOLLYWOOD I AM NOT SURE BECAUSE I AM JUST ONE ACTUALLY ASIAN GIRL SO I KNOW MY OPINION DOESN’T MATTER BUT AM I DOING ASIAN RITE

lightspeedsound:

I KNOW IT’S SUPER HARD FOR ME TO BE JUST ASIAN ENOUGH FOR THE SILVER SCREEN BECAUSE I AM ACTUALLY ASIAN SO THIS IS A HUGE HANDICAP TO OVERCOME

BUT I THINK THROUGH HARD WORK AND BEING A MODEL MINORITY I HAVE GOTTEN THERE.

PLEASE, JUST LET ME TRY OUT I TAKE EXCELLENT PICS AND I CAN IMITATE WHITE PEOPLE BEING ASIAN, NO PROBLEM. 

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LIKE I AM SORRY BECAUSE THE CLOSEST THING I HAD TO AN ORIENTAL-LOOKING RICE BASKET WAS MY CHEAP PLASTIC STRAINER BUT LOOK I TRIED.

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LIKE I KNOW I AM JUST NOT AS FIERCE AS AUDREY KATHERINE BUT I CAN LEARN. I’M GOOD AT LEARNING!

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I TOO CAN BE A SHY AND DELICATE LOTUS BLOSSOM 

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I TOO CAN SING ABOUT MY LOVE FOR A WHITE MAN WHO LEFT ME PREGGERS

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I TOO CAN LOOK WISE YET BEFUDDLED, AS FITTING RE: MY MYSTICAL HERITAGE

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PICK ME HOLLYWOOD

I KNOW I AM NOT WHITE

BUT I PROMISE BEING ASIAN IS NOT A HANDICAP

WHEN PLAYING AN ASIAN PERSON IN A MOVIE!

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politicalsexkitten
america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 
Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.
Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.
But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?
Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.
While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.
We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.
This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

How Many Women are in Prison for Defending Themselves Against Domestic Violence? | Bitch Magazine 

Marissa Alexander was sentenced to prison after firing a warning shot to protect herself from her abusive husband.

Last week, domestic violence was front-page news in America as the video of Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice beating his partner circulated online. Sunday morning news shows interviewed domestic violence survivors, social workers at domestic violence agencies, and even police chiefs about their departments’ policies around domestic violence calls.

But in all this discussion about the realities of domestic violence, one perspective was clearly left out: the people who are imprisoned for defending themselves against abusers. Where are the stories about how the legal system often punishes abuse survivors for defending themselves, usually after the legal system itself failed to ensure their safety?

Many readers already know the name Marissa Alexander, the Florida mother of three who was arrested for firing a warning shot to dissuade her abusive husband from assaulting her. In 2012, Alexander was found guilty of aggravated assault and was given a 20 year sentence. Her sentencing coincided with the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, drawing wider public attention than she might have received otherwise. People across the country rallied to her defense, organizing fundraisers and teach-ins and bringing media attention to the injustice of her case. Alexander appealed her case and was granted a new trial, which is scheduled to start in December 2014. The prosecutor has said that, this time, she will seek a sixty-year sentence for Alexander if she is convicted again.

While awaiting her new legal ordeal, Marissa Alexander is allowed to be home with two of her three children. (Her estranged husband, the same one who had assaulted her and then called the police on her, has custody of her youngest child.) If it weren’t for that outpouring of support nationwide, Marissa Alexander might very well still be in prison on that original twenty-year sentence.

We know Marissa Alexander’s name, but there are countless other abuse survivors behind prison walls whose names and stories we do not know. We actually do not know how many women are imprisoned for defending themselves against their abusers. No agency or organization seems to keep track of this information. Prison systems do not. Court systems do not. The U.S. Department of Justice has some data on intimate partner violence, but not about how often this violence is a significant factor in the woman’s incarceration. In California, a prison study found that 93 percent of the women who had killed their significant others had been abused by them. That study found that 67 percent of those women reported that they had been attempting to protect themselves or their children when they wound up killing their partner. In New York State, 67 percent of women sent to prison for killing someone close to them were abused by that person. But these are just two specific studies; no governmental agency collects data on how frequently abuse plays a direct role to prison nationwide.

This past Sunday morning, an ABC news segment reported that 70 percent of domestic violence calls do not end in prosecution. That story stressed how many abused people choose not to press charges against their loved ones. Not mentioned, however, is how often systems fail to help survivors when they doseek help. Domestic violence survivors have reported that, time and again, they sought help—from family members, from their communities, from domestic violence agencies and from police. Many times, they found that help was unavailable to them. As we collectively wring our hands about domestic violence, shelters for people seeking help remain grossly underfunded. Passing the Violence Against Women Act (which relies heavily on criminalization and arrest, both problematic for women of color and other marginalized people) required a monumental political effort. 

(Read Full Text)

Anonymous asked:

Just because he wants to look like a korean person he is NO racist. There are people who have breast implantates. Does that make someone a misogynist? No. Please stop searching racism and misogyny in every fucking human. Leave people alone who do not offend other ones. Everyone has the right to express themselves when they aren't hurting anyone and I really don't see any issue here. Just stop it. (Sorry if there are mistakes, I'm not from an English speaking state)

Here’s the thing. A white person is not and will never be asian or black. I am fucking sick of seeing marginalized groups of people being made into costumes you can chose to “identify” into. No one fucking choses to be born into an oppressed group. Cultural appropriation is racist. Black face is racist. Yellow face(what that disgusting white guy did with all his $$) is RACIST. He is offending me and I’m not even asian(also notice I’m not the only person who thinks he’s gross ty) 

You don’t see an issue? Great, I literally do not care. I take great offense when I see people make a mockery of a culture, religion, sexual orientation, race, or sex. 

I guess they were just trying to ~express~ themselves too right? 

Stop men calling themselves feminist 2k14

I know it’s really hard guys, because of your socialization you were never really told “no”- it’s a hard concept to understand that something just isn’t FOR you. So here I am to guide you on your journey of overcoming the struggle of accepting “NO”. 

1. Feminism is by and for women, we want liberation of all women from male violence.

2. Because you(men) are in the oppressor class, you cannot lead, define, or argue with the struggle AGAINST yourselves.

3. Learn how to take a support role for once, and realize it’s not about you. 

4. Congrats.